SOUTH WEST LAKES TRUST – OPENING STATEMENT

See below statement regarding the opening of South West Lakes Trust Waters. At present there is no night fishing in line with the government guidance that states no staying away from home. It is to be hoped that this will be reviewed at some point to allow 24 hours angling.

Please find below the link to our website which has the amended rules for the re-opening of fisheries and guidance around social distancing and measures to protect everyone. Its ESSENTIAL you read this information as it also includes a new update on night fishing which will not be permitted at this stage.

Fishing will be dawn to dusk with the exception of tomorrow 13 May when the fisheries re-open at 10am.

https://coarse.swlakesfishing.co.uk/coarse-angling-coronavirus-information/

This statement applies to both coarse and trout fishing.

Thankyou for your patience and understanding at this time.

Ben Smeeth

Coarse Angling: Coronavirus Information – SW Lakes Coarse Fishing
Issue date: 12 May 2020 15:45 Prior to every fishing trip, it is essential that you check the information on this page to ensure that you are up to date with relevant site information, rules and regulations. In line with government guidance to continue to stay home but enjoy more time outdoors we ar…
coarse.swlakesfishing.co.uk

ANGLING TRUST CONFIRM FISHING TO RESUME ON WEDNESDAY

Looking Good stay Safe and follow the rules.

Contemplation in Surreal Times

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Life is a little surreal right now perhaps with more time for contemplation. Pauline was sorting through an old tin of my late mothers’ memories. Most of the images raised little interest for me as I read a recently acquired book by my favourite author.

Then she came upon this old photo. Who was the fisherman in this old black and white photograph I wondered? I suspect it was my Uncle Jack who my mother recalled was a keen angler. The River was likely to be the Warwickshire Avon on a tranquil summers day in the 1940’s or early fifties.

I recall fishing the Avon several years ago on a warm September evening. Pauline and I sat beside the River opposite the Shakespeare Theatre and I drifted a float that dipped from time to time as plump gudgeon and roach seized the maggots. I was pleased to catch the gudgeon as it was these delightful fish that my mother once told me she had caught close to this very spot. Pauline and I chatted to a cheerful young man with a dog. Strange how some memories remain etched in the mind. Sometimes I wonder where the fishing gene came from for my family are not awash with keen anglers.

Part way through these jottings we went for our daily exercise or Boris walk as some have christened it. The sun was slowly sinking and wispy clouds decorated the evening sky. As we walked towards an old farm house swallows and martins swooped above in a timeless scene. Perhaps we as anglers haunt the same waters over many generations returning as time slowly drifts through the ages.

What Fishing are you missing most?

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North Devon Angling News readers kindly sent me few images to remind everyone of those better days. I got to thinking what fishing am I missing most?

Sallem Ali – Afine brace of rainbows
Chay Boggis with stunning perch
Dave Richards with brace of rainbows
Andy Facey with good brown trout.
Jeff pierce with pleasing brown trout from the River Torridge
Peter Clarke waits !
Timothy Curtis as the sunsets!

Looking for stories?

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With fishing off the agenda there is little to report on North Devon Angling news but with everyone at home I wondered if anyone would like to take on a challenge. Several who have read my book, “I Caught A Glimpse” have commented on how it brought back memories of early days at the waters edge and how our paths have been similar.

Its not easy staying at home away from the waters edge so I thought it would be good if a few readers could take half an hour to recall your earliest angling memories from North Devon. If you could send me your contributions via email or messenger ideally with an image I will have a read through and publish.  [email protected]

Of course if your at a loose end you could always settle down in garden and read a good book!

ANGLERS PARADISE _ Raises thousands more for good causes!

Anglers Paradise are delighted to share with you that from a year’s fundraising at Anglers Paradise with Raffles, Quizzes and Netting Events we have raised over £7000 and have given to the following Charities –

Over and Above – Cardiology supporting the Northern Devon Healthcare NHS Trust, Air Ambulance, Active Halwill, Emergency Volunteer Drs, Halwill Primary School and the Okehampton St.Boniface Church. We are very thankful to all our customers that helped us raise this and help so many worthy causes. We look forward to raising more in 2020!!

An Evening with Chris Yates

In 1986 I remember eagerly collecting my copy of the book ‘Casting at the Sun’ by Christopher Yates. I read the book enthralled  from cover to cover as it described angling adventures on mystical lakes where great carp glided through mysterious waters. In my view the book is the best piece of angling literature ever written encompassing much of anglings true essence.

Thirty odd years later Pauline and I set off to listen to a talk by Chris at Pentridge Village hall in Wiltshire.

We left our farmhouse B & B on a  wet and misty evening in late November driving through tree lined rural village lanes. On such an evening the sat nav was a welcome guide to our destination. As we entered the village of Pentridge we were guided by signs to Chris Yates that eventually brought us to a chaotic assembly of randomly parked cars.

We entered the village hall that was packed with an audience predominated by men. It was pleasing to see a wide mix of ages with several younger faces smiling enthusiastically as they chatted, swapping tales of a predominantly piscatorial nature. The hall proved the perfect venue with its high ceiling and timeless décor that would I imagine have changed little in recent decades unlike many village halls that have been modernised and sanitised.

This was the third evening talk featuring Chris with each event selling out and raising substantial funds to assist in cancer research. Anglers had travelled from far and wide to listen to the talk with visitors from the Netherlands, South Wales and North Yorkshire to name a few.  What entices people to travel so far on a cold wet November night?

Chris arrived receiving a warm welcome from the packed hall and chatted warmly to all signing books and other paraphernalia. Winners of an auction to spend a day fishing with Chris were given special certificates and raffle prizes were announced as those present dug deep into their wallets in the hope of winning a valuable prize.

The event organiser Neil Martin introduced Chris to the audience who immediately adopted a hushed tone of anticipation. And so, the talk began with Chris announcing that he was not sure where the talk would lead. Starting off with his latest passion for marsh harriers Chris delivered a mesmerising talk that flowed easily reminiscing about fishing in rivers and lakes whilst weaving in fascinating stories of ghosts, lost friends and other adventures. The core essence of Chris’s delivery was one of fun, humour and a connection with the natural world.

After a lengthy break with more book signing it was time for the raffle draw with some stunning and memorable prizes on offer. I was delighted to win a Lucky Crucian carp float donated by Chris. A treasured memento of a special night.

The raffle was followed by a fascinating question and answer session between Chris and the audience covering more fishy tales, tactics and ghostly goings on.

And so, the evening drew to a close and we set off into the night our minds swimming with fish and countryside visions. Mr Yates is certainly an antidote to the negativity of this modern world.

Below – My recent book ” I Caught A Glimpse” Is available from – https://thelittleegretpress.co.uk

SEASONS and CHANGING TIMES – A few thought from the waters edge.

Autumn seems to be setting in early this year with the salmon fishing seasons end almost upon us and no prospect of wetting a line with heavy rain bringing a big spate that has come too late to save what has been a lacklustre season as a result of low flows for much of the year. On the plus side the swollen rivers will enable salmon and sea trout to forge upriver and with no anglers or nets to impede their progress they will hopefully successfully spawn ensuring fish for future seasons.

Autumn colours are already showing on many trees on higher ground; martins and swallows are glimpsed as they head south battling the autumn gales as they start their epic journey. In a few weeks they will be swooping over a different landscape in Africa with elephants, lion and wildebeest instead of red deer, foxes and badgers. Each year these natural migrations take place and to some extent we take it all for granted expecting it all to continue year on year. Sadly things don’t always go on and we should watch with concern as nature faces troubled times. I read today of a threat to the Horse Chestnut trees and a shortage of conkers. Ash die back threatens to decimate our woodland.

As I drive around North Devon I am dismayed at the number of houses being built. Have we the infrastructure to cope? How will all of this impact upon the natural landscape and wildlife of North Devon? My recently published book “I Caught A Glimpse” reflects upon a North Devon I grew up in. Each year the stories within its pages seem far removed from the present day.

The coming months are often the best of the year for many anglers with carp already showing from our local lakes at impressive weights their bronze flanks reflecting autumns hues. Stillwater trout are likely to bring exciting sport. On the coast sea anglers will be relishing the chance to catch tope, bass, conger, Huss and grey mullet. In the estuary flounder anglers will enjoy simple fishing as rod tips rattle as bunches of ragworm are engulfed.

These autumn storms will of course pass and warm sunshine will bring reminders of summer warmth. November generally gives those first chill days but even then garfish and mackerel can bring a pleasant surprise on the coast. Part of the joy of angling is not knowing what will happen next and being out there by the water is a constant adventure. What better place to watch the drama of life on earth unfold?

Volunteer Required – Can you help to enable a gentleman to continue his fishing passion?

I received an enquiry from Samantha Mathews who works for Valorum Care asking if I knew of anyone who could help a gentlemen to prolong his angling experiences. I know from my interviews with several senior anglers that the passion for angling is still there years after they are forced to leave the waters edge. I am sure that the below opportunity would be very rewarding.

Volunteer Required – Can you help to enable a gentleman to continue his fishing passion?

We are looking for a person, or people, to help a gentleman continue his passion for angling. He loves to spend hours fishing and returning the fish to its environment.  Due to physical disability he cannot do this without company and support.  He would love the opportunity to spend time outdoors with like-minded people.  You would ideally need to be a driver willing to drive one of our Valorum Foundation vehicles – for which we would give you training.  We would also give training in how to support a wheelchair user and any other areas you feel useful.

We are based in Braunton but could reimburse your fuel costs to us.  If this sounds like something you could do or would like to ask any questions please contact the Volunteer Co-ordinator, Sam Mathews on [email protected] or telephone 01271 815915

It would be fantastic if you could place an advert for Francois.  I’m running ideas around with regards to the social meeting idea as well so please feel free to pass my details on to anybody who you think may be interested.