REPORTING POLLUTION INCIDENTS TO THE EA – 0800 807060

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REPORTING POLLUTION INCIDENTS TO THE EA
Our rivers are in my view the arteries of the land and it is our responsibility to do all that we can to safeguard them. As anglers we spend many hours both beside and in the water and have the opportunity to spot signs of pollution or activities that could have a negative impact. The Environment Agency are the main body responsible for dealing with issues and it is to them that we must report our concerns. The more we report the more chance of issues being addressed. I have heard comment from some that there is no point reporting things as nothing gets done. This attitude has no benefit for it just reinforces the belief. Speak up raise awareness of issues and then if its not dealt with raise the fact with your local MP or other body. We have a voice they are our rivers and deserve to be cherished.
Anglers are reminded that reporting incidents to the EA is an individual responsibility. It is particularly important in times of drought or low flows.
If you come across an incident that includes any of the following:
  • damage or danger to the natural environment
  • pollution to water or land
  • poaching or illegal fishing
  • dead fish or fish gasping for air
  • main rivers blocked by a vehicle or fallen tree causing risk of flooding
  • flooding from any river, stream, canal, natural spring or the sea
  • illegal removals from watercourses
  • unusual changes in river flow
  • collapsed or badly damaged river or canal banks
 
You should call the EA Incident Hotline on: 0800 807060 – without delay. Time may be of the essence. 
 
Your report will be made in complete confidence. Save the number into your mobile phone and pass it on to others.
 
If you make a call to this number it is recorded and the EA are duty bound to act on it. Do not hesitate or prevaricate.

DISMAY & ANGER – At Fish kill

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North Devon’s anglers are shocked, angry and dismayed following news of a major fish kill on the River Mole one of the River Taws main tributaries. Various reports indicate that up 10,000 fish have perished over a 5km stretch including salmon, sea trout and brown trout. Early indications are that the pollution was anaerobic digestate. It is vital that the perpetrators are apprehended and a substantial response is imposed by the Environment Agency. A vast amount of time, effort and energy has been invested in improving the habitat of the Taw and its tributaries and it is heart-breaking that this has been impacted upon so severely by this tragic event. With river levels very low at the time of the pollution impact is likely to be severe with no dilution. Anglers are very often first on the scene and should report any incidents immediately to the Environment Agency via their hotline number 0800 807060. Whilst I seldom comment politically, I do feel saddened that the EA’s funding has been cut over recent years as focus is directed elsewhere. As voters’ anglers should give serious consideration to environmental issues when casting their votes.

I have very fond memories of fishing on the Mole and encounters with sea trout and otters. It is to be hoped that the river recovers from this tragic event. Lessons must be learnt from this to prevent future incidents and it is hoped that the penalty imposed will go some way towards highlighting the need for vigilance.

The rate of decline in West Country Rivers is truly alarming. In the forty years that I have visited the rivers I have seen a dramatic collapse in stocks. Remember that in natural terms forty or fifty years are short spans when you consider the long term evolution of salmon and sea trout. Each generation of anglers relates to their own life beside the water and as a result often fail to comprehend the longer term decline in stocks.

The interviews I conducted in research for my soon to be published book , “I Caught A Glimpse” have brought this home to me. Whilst it would be nice to think that salmon will be running our rivers for future generations; I have my doubts. It is likely that without a huge effort salmon will be non-existent within many West Country Rivers within decades. That this should happen during our watch is shameful.

SEDIMENT POLLUTION CONCERNS

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Izzy Moser of the Devon Wildlife Trust shared these images on Devon Wildlife Trust Twitter Feed today they show the extent of sediment in the Taw today following heavy rain. As game fishers we all look forward to a summer spate that brings fish in from the sea but we hope to see a river the colour of beer not a muddy torrent.

Izz Moser writes :- Sorry for circulation email but I was fairly shocked looking at the River Taw this morning to see how brown the water was after last nights rainfall. This is definitely the worst I have seen it. It was disgusting.

I thought I would use the photos to hopefully raise the profile of sediment issues.

Photos attached – although I have to say they really do not do it justice.

If anyone would like to share the photos further, please do… I have shared them via the Devon Wildlife Trust Twitter feed.

Izzy Moser (Left) at the Fly Monitoring earlier this spring.